What does your Font Cost?

Inside A.S. Watson Fortress And Watsons Stores As Temasek Diversifies From China Banks With Hutchison Whampoa's Retail Arm

One of the most common fonts used in business is Times New Roman, but is it the most cost effective?

A bit of history first.

Times New Roman was designed in 1932. The Times newspaper introduced it in response to a criticism about its newspaper being printed badly and typographically behind the times. In response, The Times commissioned a typeface design company to improve the newspaper’s “economy of space” and “legibility”. The resulting design, Times New Roman, is based on the Plantin typeface redesign of 1913, the original design of which goes back to the 16th century Garamond typeface. Times New Roman is appropriate for reading plain texts such as contracts as it has a firm authoritative ‘look and feel’

The alternative, therefore, is Garamond. The design that is currently in use was originally designed in the mid sixteenth century. This member of the Roman type family has survived the centuries because of its remarkable readability. As one of the oldest typefaces, Garamond conveys a sense of solid tradition, yet is still soft and attractive thanks to its elegantly rounded serifs and its diagonally emphasised strokes.

Whilst what font you use may be a matter of individual taste or company policy have you ever considered the relevant cost of using a particular font? I would guess not.

A recent study in the US carried out by a 14-year-old student details how the U.S. government could save about $234 million a year by simply switching the type of font that is used on printed documents.

In his study, young Suvir Mirchandani, found that Garamond is a more efficient font than Times New Roman for printing. This is because Garamond uses thinner strokes for its letters, meaning less ink or toner is used on each character.

He found that the saving by switching fonts would amount to 29%. Based on his research and randomly choosing an HP cartridge (an HP301XL) with an average page cost of 5p (based on HP pricing and yield), changing font you could save almost 1.5p per page or over £7 for every ream of paper you use.

This research may have been done by a young man with too much time on his hands but it is certainly worth bearing in mind.

If you would like to see how ITQ could make substantial savings on your printing/copying download our white paper.

3 thoughts on “What does your Font Cost?

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s